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My Italian Short Break

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By | Blog, Rome, Amalfi Coast, Venice, Florence | Posted 16 Jun 2016

My Italian Short Break

Recently I got the chance to escape my desk for several weeks and embark on my own Italian short break. The trip began in Venice and wound its way through Florence, Rome, Sorrento and Sicily. Along the way there were also day trips to some of the lesser known cities which just proves how every city in Italy has its own personality and plenty of history.

Returning to Venice, the starting point of my Italian short break was wonderful. There is always so much to see in Venice that it is best to be prepared and focus in on exactly what you want to do. For first timers this involves St Mark’s Square, for those returning for a second trip or maybe a seasonal returner to Venice, La Fenice Opera House or a tour of the islands of Murano, Burano and Torcello.

The first thing that you always notice with St Mark’s Square is how crowded it is. Most of the people are headed to the main two attractions; the Basilica and the Doges Palace. Whilst the Basilica is free to access, the crowds are not so time friendly, especially for the spring and summer months. There are two way to avoid sometimes excessive queuing for both buildings. The first is by having a Venice St Mark’s Card. This 24hr card provides free access to both sights by way of heading to the Pass Holder Line. This card will only cost you €18 per person and whilst the Basilica does not take long to visit, the Doges Palace does need around two hours, making this card very relevant. The palace itself is beautiful, but there is just as much going on below the ground in the prison accessed through the Bridge of Sighs. The other option is to have a private guided tour. This means no queuing and a thorough understanding of everything you will see.

St Mark's Square in Venice, Italy

Arriving on the day into Pisa I once again met the crowds present in Venice. This time however it was still possible to easily find your way around and I did everything I wanted. The buildings around the outside of the church and the Learning Tower are worth a visit. The frescoes are still largely in tact, although you might not want to look too closely at the Dantesque vision of Heaven and Hell!

The Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy

No less beautiful and steeped wildly in Renaissance art is Florence. This city actually packs in probably the most sights in a relatively small place. Having previously spent two weeks there on a different Italian short break, I tried two methods of making the most of my time. The first involved Florence’s equivalent Pass Card, which lasts for 72hrs and provides access to most of the local sights. The cost does make a bit of a dent in the wallet at €72 per person, so you really want to make the most of the three days. Another plus is free access to the buses with the Florence Pass Card. The other way to see Florence’s main attractions is having a Priority Line Pass, which I did for both the Uffizi Gallery and the Accademia Gallery, the latter to see Michelangelo’s statue. I think I would probably still be queuing if I had turned up without a Priority Line Pass!

Onwards to Rome! Again even in May the crowds were already in force in the coliseum, which was worth a visit. Time-wise this does not take too long out of your day though, so very easy to cover the Roman Forum as well. At the time of my visit the Spanish Steps were going through refurbishment, so I was unable to see them in all their glory, but there is always another trip!

The Colisseum in Rome, Italy

After a sweltering day in the heat I arrived in Pompeii for a tour of this incredibly preserved city. The views across Pompeii and the remains of the statues left partially intact made for some interesting photos, including the one below! I don't think I appreciated just how vast Pompeii was before my visit.

Pompeii in Italy

Heading to Amalfi I got to see the coastal roads around Sorrento and Ravello first hand. I’m glad I wasn’t driving as the views around every corner were very distracting! Both places were beautiful, and I particularly recommend the Villa Rufolo Gardens in Ravello. When I came out I had a bit of time to shop and that was when I got to do an impromptu limoncello tasting offered by one of the shops as you walk down the main shopping street. I still have not made my mind up which I liked the most – lemon, melon, chocolate, pistachio or cream flavour!

The last part of the trip was in Taormina in Italy. I had plenty of time here to enjoy the main town, got to witness a wedding, (ironically a wedding reception was held at my hotel that evening – different bride and groom!) and the open-air amphitheater. Whilst gaining access to the amphitheatre was a surprising €10 the view looking through to the bay was well worth the expense.

So, what a trip! As always an Italian short break promises great weather, food, wine and culture - what more do you need?!

 

 

 

About Hannah Netting

Hannah has had the travel bug from an early age where she was fortunate enough to travel widely, including a four month trip around the world. For her experiencing new cultures, sights and wonders was very important.

Lately her focus has been heavily on Italy enhanced by many wonderful trips including Verona, Venice, Top to Toe, Florence, amongst many others. In Venice she got lost in true Venetian style and got to experience the amazing acoustics of the Verona Arena. Currently Florence is her favourite, but this can always change! With plenty on offer in Italy, it will keep her entertained for many more trips to come!

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